TransAlpina
Newly open to the public in July 2011. Build by the Romans, consolidated by the German Nazis. Lots of tourists and higher than Transfagarasan the most beautiful and magnificent alpine road to see, even better than Stelvio Pass. The Transalpina or DN67C located in the Parâng Mountains group, in the Southern Carpathians of Romania, is one of the most spectacular roads of the Carpathian Mountains. It connects Novaci, south of Parâng Mountains, to Sebeş in the north. It is said that the road was built under King Carol II and rebuilt during World War II by German troops and it is called The King's Road by the locals. Also a story has it that Nicolae Ceauşescu had the Transfăgărăşan Road (DN7C) built during the communist regime just to surpass the Transalpina. The road has its highest point at the Urdele Pass, where the elevation is 2,145m above sea level. Given the high altitude, the road is closed during the cold months of the year. Works began in 2007 in order to transform this spectacular road into a modern highway (148 km), allowing a rapid transit between Oltenia and Transylvania.Rânca, a newly developed resort, is located towards the south end of the Transalpina road.
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TransFagarasan
The Transfăgărășan (trans (over, across) + Făgăraș) or DN7C is the second-highest paved road in Romania. Built as a strategic military route, the 90 km of twists and turns run north to south across the tallest sections of the Southern Carpathians, between the highest peak in the country, Moldoveanu, and the second highest, Negoiu. The road connects the historic regions of Transylvania and Wallachia, and the cities of Sibiu and Pitești. The road was constructed between 1970 and 1974, during the rule of Nicolae Ceaușescu. It came as a response to the 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia by the Soviet Union. Ceaușescu wanted to ensure quick military access across the mountains in the event the Soviets attempted a similar move into Romania. Consequently, the road was built mainly with military forces, at a high cost both financially and from a human standpoint—roughly 6 million kilograms of dynamite were used on the northern face, and the official records mention that about 40 soldiers lost their lives in building accidents. In September 2009 the cast and crew of the British television show Top Gear were seen filming along the road.The segment appeared in first episode of Series 14 which first aired November 15, 2009. They were in the country on a grand tour with an Aston Martin DBS Volante, Ferrari California and a Lamborghini Gallardo LP560-4 Spyder. Jeremy Clarkson, the Top Gear host, had said about Transfăgărășan that "this is the best road... in the world" – a title the program's presenters had previously given to the Stelvio Pass in Italy.
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